KPIs for All SME Businesses

Posted by on Feb 7, 2014 in Budgeting and Forecasting, Drivers of Cash Flow, Working Capital

The truth is in the cash flow

KPIs for All SME Businesses

The play, “A Man for All Seasons” tells the story of Sir Thomas More, the C16th Chancellor of England who refused to endorse Henry VIII’s wish to divorce his wife, Catherine of Aragon. More was a man of great integrity, who whilst pragmatically adapting to changing circumstances, remained true to his beliefs despite enormous pressure being brought to bear upon him.

This article will describe a set of KPIs for SMEs that behave in a similar fashion to Sir Thomas More. These KPIs offer the SME owner a succinct and relevant insight into their business under all conditions, irrespective of Industry, external factors or pressures. Being easily identified and measured they are pragmatic. They are the “Universal KPIs” I referred to in The Emperor’s New Clothes (About KPIs).

Those of you who have read some of my earlier articles may have guessed the identity of my Universal KPIs. I introduced them in The Magnificent Seven and built on that introduction with posts on interpreting financial information (Cracking the Code) and understanding working capital (Seeing the Light (On Working Capital)).

The table below sets out my Universal KPIs and depicts a hypothetical business story (click on the table to expand it):

KPI Table

This table shows Monthly and Year to Date outcomes for my Universal KPIs. The stories told by the table are summarised below, which I hope will help the reader appreciate the clarity of the insight provided by these KPIs.

The Monthly Story

Sales are $45k below budget. However, the above budget Gross Margin of 47% has reduced this cash drain to $9.65k. Operating Expenses (which exclude Interest Expense and Depreciation) are $10k lower than forecast. The net outcome is a small inflow of $350, relative to the budget expectations.

Debtor Days have shrunk to 60 from 62 in the prior month, but the average time taken to collect debtors remains slower than the budget expectation (55 days). Nevertheless, the 2 day reduction in debtor days compared to the prior month has brought $30.7k of cash into the business. Stock Days have shrunk to 95 from 97 in the prior month, but the average time taken to sell stock remains slower than the budget expectation (90 days). Nevertheless, the 2 day reduction in stock days, relative to the prior month, has brought $16.7k of cash into the business. Creditor Days have expanded to 40 days from 37 days in the prior month, and Creditors are now being paid 1 day slower than the budget expectation (39 days). In the current month, the 3 day expansion in Creditor Days has resulted in $25k being retained in the business. Shortening the Cash Conversion Cycle by 7 days during the month has brought $72.4k of cash into the business.

Capital Expenditure in the month was $10k, in line with budget.

In summary: The cash brought into the business from its earnings during the month was in line with budget, albeit the manner in which this was achieved was different from expectation. The actual cash used for capital expenditure purposes met budget. The vast majority of the $72.75k of cash brought into the business during the month is due to a shortening of the Cash Conversion Cycle relative to the prior month.

The Year to Date Story

Sales are $400k below budget. However, the above budget Gross Margin of 45.6% has reduced this cash drain to $146.4k. Operating Expenses are $50k below budget, further reducing the cash drain to $96.4k.

Debtor Days are averaging 60 days, slower than the budget expectation of 55 days, leading to a $16.4k outflow of cash from the business. Stock Days are averaging 95 days, slower than the budget expectation of 90 days. Nevertheless, despite the slower stock turnover there has been a $20.8k inflow of cash in the Year to Date, reflecting the lower business activity and higher gross margins. Creditor Days are averaging 40 days, slower than the 39 days forecast, resulting in $18.8k of cash being retained in the business. Although the Cash Conversion Cycle has expanded by 9 days from 106 days per the forecast to 115 days there has been a net cash inflow of $23.2k, due to a shrinkage in Sales and the higher Gross Margin.

Capital Expenditure on a Year to Date basis is $40k, a saving of $10k on the budget, resulting in that amount of cash being retained in the business.

In summary: The net outcome is that the business has $63.3k less cash than forecast. This outcome has mainly been driven by the lower Sales, which an improved Gross Margin, lower Operating Expenses, lower Capital Expenditure and a modest inflow of working capital funds (as a consequence of the shrinking business activity, not due to a shortening of the Cash Conversion Cycle) has not been sufficient to offset.

All of these factors can be influenced by an SME owner. Indeed, if the Cash Conversion Cycle had met the budget expectation the result would have been a $10k cash inflow into the business in the year to date, relative to expectations.

The Message for an SME Owner

 When I worked in banking, these seven factors were the major drivers of our financial forecasting software (there were a few others: depreciation rates, interest rates, tax rates, dividend rates etc).  They are used because of their close link to the “operational” cash flow of an SME business.

This in part explains why they make great KPIs for an SME. The other significant factor in their suitability as KPIs is that the SME owner can make decisions and take actions that impact on each of theses 7 factors, and hence directly impact the cash flow of their business.

I regard them as Universal because all SME businesses, regardless of Industry, are capable of measuring Sales, Gross Margin, Operating Expenses, Debtor Days, Stock Days (or for professional firms, its equivalent, Work In Progress Days), Creditor Days and Capital Expenditure.

So, if you own a small or medium-sized business and would like to know more about its financial and cash flow health then a good place to start is by tracking these 7 factors on a monthly and year to date basis.